Plant Based Diets

Whole Systems Healthcare

The longest living populations, in so called “Blue Zones”, follow what can be considered a plant-based diet. For general guidelines on how to eat well, refer to our article Basic Dietary Guidelines.

Researchers have shown that a more plant-based diet may help prevent, treat, or reverse some of our leading causes of death, including heart diseasetype 2 diabetes, and high blood pressure. Interventional studies of plant-based diets have shown, for example, 90 percent reductions in angina attacks within just a few weeks. Plant-based diet intervention groups have reported greater diet satisfaction than control groups, as well as improved digestion, increased energy, and better sleep, and significant improvement in their physical functioning, general health, vitality, and mental health. Studies have shown plant-based eating can improve not only body weight, blood sugar levels, and ability to control cholesterol, but also emotional states, including depression, anxiety, fatigue, sense of well-being, and daily functioning.

Only one way of eating has ever been proven to reverse heart disease in the majority of patients: a diet centered around whole plant foods. If that’s all a whole-food, plant-based diet could do—reverse our number-one killer—shouldn’t that be the default diet until proven otherwise? The fact it may also be effective in preventing, treating, and arresting other leading killers seems to make the case for plant-based eating simply overwhelming.

Author

  • Michael Greger, MD FACLM, is a physician and the founder of NutritionFacts.org. This article was originally published on NutritionFacts.org